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Original Article
01 (
04
); 021-024
doi:
10.1055/s-0038-1656498

Type 2 Myocardial Infarction in Acute Medical Care

Senior resident, Cardiology, NIMS, Hyderabad, India
Junior resident, General medicine, NIMS, Hyderabad, India
Professor and HOD, General medicine, NIMS, Hyderabad, India
Address for correspondence dr.satishkilli@gmail.com
Licence
This is an open access article published by Thieme under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonDerivative-NonCommercial License, permitting copying and reproduction so long as the original work is given appropriate credit. Contents may not be used for commercial purposes, or adapted, remixed, transformed or built upon. (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/)
Disclaimer:
This article was originally published by Thieme Medical and Scientific Publishers Private Ltd. and was migrated to Scientific Scholar after the change of Publisher; therefore Scientific Scholar has no control over the quality or content of this article.

Abstract

Abstract

Background: Type 2 myocardial infarction (MI) is defined as MI secondary to ischemia due to either increased oxygen demand or decreased supply. It is seen in conditions other than coronary artery disease (CAD) contributes to an imbalance between myocardial oxygen supply and/or demand. Little is known about patient characteristics and clinical outcomes.

Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed in patients who were admitted in acute medical care with symptoms suggestive of myocardial ischemia and enzymatic elevation from January 2015 to December 2015. Patients with slight elevation (above the upper limit of normal) of CK-MB were included in the study and compared the clinical and laboratory profile between men and women.

Results: This survey includes a total of 54 patients, Out of which complete details were available in 41 patients (M:23; F:18). The mean age was 42.61. The common causes of type-II MI were Infectious (M:9 (39.1%), F:10 (55.6%) followed by haematological disorders (M:3 (13%), F:5 (27.7%). The mean CK-MB was 28.00. The mean CPK was 122.5. There was no hypotension, renal failure at the time of admission. One patient had in-hospital mortality out of all patients, whose primary diagnosis was septicaemia with shock who had normal CPK, elevated CK-MB and elevated NT pro BNP levels. Patients with type-II MI were not referred for coronary interventions and managed conservatively.

Conclusions: There is no significant difference in the risk for type 2 MI between men and women. Clinical suspicion and diagnosis of type 2 MI is crucial in acute medical care setting, as the mortality can be reduced with adequate management of underlying condition. The threshold of biomarker levels should be low (above the upper limit of normal in symptomatic ischemia) to label type 2 MI contrary to the third universal definition of MI.

Keywords

Myocardial infarction
Acute Medical Care
Incidence

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